Warning: array_shift() [function.array-shift]: The argument should be an array in /home/www/vestris/www/config/ecran_securite.php on line 283

Warning: file_get_contents(/proc/loadavg) [function.file-get-contents]: failed to open stream: Permission denied in /home/www/vestris/www/config/ecran_securite.php on line 284
Société Auguste Vestris - The life of Yvonne Cartier (1928-2014)
  Auguste Vestris


Titre
 

Essais / Essays

Dans la même rubrique
In the same section


イヴォンヌ・カルチエの生涯
The life of Yvonne Cartier (1928-2014)
オーギュスト・ヴェストリスとはどんな人だったのか
The One and the Many - When the Many is One too Much
Nicola Guerra (1865-1942)
Enrico Cecchetti’s ’Days of the Week’
Piotr Frantsevitch Lesgaft (1837-1909)
« Précipiter une nouvelle ère poétique »
Qu’est-ce l’étirement ?
How valuable is the Cecchetti Method in ballet training today?
Qui était Auguste Vestris ?
’L’en-dehors dans le marbre’
(The Turnout, as it appears in Marble)

Le Satyre dansant de Mazara del Vallo
se pose au Louvre

« Danseur noble » ou « danseur de demi-caractère » ?
Kick-Ass, or Jackass?

Les rubriques
All sections :













 

The life of Yvonne Cartier (1928-2014)
10 August 2014

Printable version / Version imprimable   |  2368 visits / visites

 

“Then there was Yvonne Cartier as the hero; this remarkable artist has a quiet mastery of all Western forms of mime and her interpretation of the travesti role of Franz was a model of charm and historical insight, making the part come to life with a thousand subtle touches.”
Fernau Hall in the Daily Telegraph, May 26th 1970
“You shall always be with me as you were – bubbling with life, elegant in thought and deed, and above all, giving from a kind and generous heart. Every day, as I place my hand on the barre I shall think of you; your teaching will live on through us - I see it now as our duty. What a joy to have known you, to have learnt so much thanks to your boundless devotion to art! For even after so lengthy a career, you could still be surprised and delighted!
"There are encounters that change one’s life. For all you have given us, I can only say Thank You Yvonne.”
Emma Brest, Cannes Jeune Ballet, May 13th 2014

 

JPEG
Aged under 6

At three decades’ interval, the words above – penned respectively by great experience and by youth – sum up the whirlwind that was Yvonne Cartier, who died on May 11th in Paris.

A maverick who invariably headed straight off the beaten path, Yvonne Cartier was a former Royal Ballet soloist who became a specialist in mime technique, and as a teacher of classical dance, an unsung hero.

Of French and Irish extraction, Yvonne was born in 1928 near Auckland, and began her theatrical career at the age of four.

Immediately after World War II, thanks to her work under Bettina Edwards, herself a pupil of Margaret Craske, Yvonne won an RAD Overseas Scholarship to the Sadler’s Wells Ballet School. After graduating, she joined the hit revue Sauce Tartare alongside Audrey Hepburn (Yvonne was an exceptionally beautiful redhead), while studying with Vera Volkova and Audrey de Vos.

In 1949, she joined Alan Carter’s Saint James Ballet Company, and in 1950, was soloist with the B.B.C. TV Resident Ballet Company, dancing, inter alia, Swanilda to David Blair’s Franz. After touring with the Covent Garden Opera Company, she met up with John Cranko’s troupe at the Henley-on-Thames Festival to save the Kenton Theatre. Just as she was becoming disillusioned with all the “mushroom companies” offering no stable work (touring conditions at the time were often appalling, and she recalled having slept in rooms where no windows would close, and the sheets were coated in ice) in 1952 Sadler’s Wells Theatre Ballet recruited her as soloist. There, in the demi-caractère rôles at which she excelled (including the lead in Pineapple Poll), she caught Ninette de Valois’ eye and in 1955 joined the main company, Sadler’s Wells Ballet, as soloist.

Unfortunately, bone spurs, incurable at the time, caused her pain to a degree that in 1957, Yvonne resigned from the then-Royal Ballet and left to study at Jacques Lecoq’s mime school in Paris with a letter of recommendation from Margot Fonteyn. Proud to a fault, only years later did she tell de Valois the truth about why she had left.

Peggy Van Praagh however did not forget Yvonne. In 1958, for the Edinburgh International Festival, Peggy insisted on her joining as ballet mistress to tour Europe with an all-star troupe (Carla Fracci, Henning Kronstam, Kirsten Simone, Elsa Marianne Von Rosen, Claire Sombert, Max Bozzoni, Milorad Miskovic, Georges Skibine ….)

Shortly thereafter, Yvonne was invited back to London to dance Carabosse in the cast led by Fonteyn and Somes for the BBC’s 1959 film of The Sleeping Beauty.

She then returned to France and joined Lecoq’s troupe; they toured Europe and did television shows in the UK and Italy, as well as the BBC documentary Hands as a Means of Communication (1961).

In 1963 she was recruited by the great mime Marcel Marceau, with whom she again toured widely. Later in the decade, she worked at the Théâtre National Populaire as assistant director to Michel Cacoyannis and George Wilson. She also taught mime for many years at the Ecole Charles Dullin, and in the 1970s, choreographed for stage plays directed by Claude Confortès.

Yvonne’s final appearance on stage was as Franz to Noëlle Christian’s Swanilda, for the Royal Ballet Organisation’s Ballet for All. To mark the centenary of Coppelia, Paulette Dynalix and Lucien Duthoit of the Paris Opera reconstructed Saint-Léon’s version, which tourned the UK, attracting much favourable comment.

In 1961, she returned to teaching classical dance, and in 1969 introduced the RAD system to France, being made an RAD life member in 1995 in appreciation of her work. As the remarkable quality of Yvonne’s teaching became bruited about, she was invited to join the staff of the Conservatoires of the City of Paris. Three of her students - Muriel Valtat, Betina Marcolin and (following Yvonne’s stint leading the Dance Department at the Saskatchewan School of Performing Arts), Tonia Stefiuk-Olson - were awarded the RAD Solo Seal and went on to distinguished careers: recipient of the first Phyllis Bedells Bursary, twice awarded Bronze in the Adeline Genée competition, Muriel became first soloist with the Royal Ballet (1992-2003). Bétina, formerly soloist with The Royal Swedish Ballet, is now a noted choreographer and teacher in Stockholm. Awarded the Solo Seal, then finalist at the Adeline Genée Competition in 1991, Tonia was for over a decade soloist with Salt Lake City Ballet.

In the 1980s, many “old school” teachers quit the profession, demoralised by the craze for hyper-extensions and “Legs-Up Dance” as Leo Kersley put it. Others simply went along with the trend and tried to “make it work”. Yvonne, however, insisted on teaching what she had learnt from the great masters. Anatomically-correct placement eschewing all exaggeration, arms firmly supported through the back and ideally formed at all times no matter the speed or momentum, lightning-swift batterie learnt from Errol Addison, and the stripping-away of all tics and mannerisms.

Yvonne loved the theatre, the science of acting, the comedy and the tragedy of it, and was pitiless with “standardised” emotion” and wan “ballet faces”. Each gesture, even in class, must be driven by an appropriate emotional response to the music. Every moment, even in class, must be alive, animated, and led by the spirit.

In 2007, Yvonne Cartier joined the Société Auguste Vestris as a founding member, and led many of its rehearsals. Coaching young professionals until a few months before her death, she kept her caustic sense of humour and headstrong enthusiasm to the very last.

PNG
2010, at the Centre de danse du Marais, Paris

Clockwise from left to right: Emma Brest, Pier Paolo Gobbo,
Alice Petit, Alexandra Bogdanova.


From Yvonne Cartier’s
friends and students on her death
De la part des amis et élèves d’Yvonne Cartier
à l’occasion de sa mort

Emma Brest, Jeune Ballet de Cannes

Chère Yvonne,

Vous demeurerez pour moi une femme pétillante, d’une élégance rare et surtout une personne au grand coeur. Je sais que vous resterez à nos côtés et que vous serez toujours dans nos pensées. Vous êtes avec moi chaque jour dès que je pose ma main sur la barre; votre enseignement perdurera à travers nous. C’est maintenant notre devoir. Je suis heureuse de vous avoir connu, d’avoir tellement appris grâce au dévouement sans limite que vous portiez à votre art , car même après une longue carrière, vous arriviez toujours à être surprise et émerveillée.
Vous êtes l’une de ses rencontres qui changent une vie; et pour tout cela je ne peux que vous dire: MERCI Yvonne.

Bétina Marcolin, Former soloist, Ballet of the Royal Opera, Stockholm

En souvenir d´Yvonne Cartier

Yvonne was in herself a whole institution. She not only taught dance, she formed her pupils to the spirit of Dance and The Arts in general.
Talking and above all listening to Yvonne could take hours and being her student feels more like being her"disciple". She had a very wide range of knowledge and kept herself updated, there were very few subjects that she hadn´t anything to say about. She shared it and time just flew.
No dancing movement or gesture was unimportant to her and one had always to find an intention, everything mattered. And if you didn´t have anything to say while dancing, why do it?
There are so many good moments to remember with her, and also her phenomenal stubbornness, as one says in French: Elle était têtue! and we have probably all shaken our heads with saying "Tu connais Yvonne", when none of our understanding could explain her choices. Yvonne had a very strong artistic integrity.
Yvonne always amazed me how she could remember steps and not only from classical ballet. Some years ago we were talking about folk dance among other things, and about Serbia. She then just stood up and did a whole Serbian folkdance without music. She was a bit upset because she had forgotten one or two steps from that dance she learned more than 50 years ago...
Sailing through the sea of Art is not always easy and she might have been missunderstood sometimes, but we will probably catch up one day and understand.
Working with her and being with her has undoubtly made a great impact, probably even bigger than one can imagine. The rings in water have just started to spread and one can say across the world. I am sure she will continue to support us from where she is and follow our steps.
With a deep bow, thank you from the bottom of my heart and of all the people that came across you.

Tonia Stefiuk-Olson, Former soloist, Salt Lake City Ballet

I was a student of Madame Cartier’s for the short time that she spent in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan with the School of Performing Arts. It was because of her that I found the courage to leave Saskatoon and move to Vancouver to join the Goh Ballet Academy. I completed my RAD Solo Seal and was a finalist at the Adeline Genee Competition in 1991. Upon graduation, I joined the Ottawa Ballet under the directorship of Frank Augustyn as soloist (1991-1994), and then spent 10 years as a soloist with Salt Lake City Ballet (1994-2004).
In 2004, I retired from dance and returned to Saskatoon where I am now working as a nurse. I have led a wonderful life and I thank heaven to have been blessed to have spent time with Madame Cartier.

Solange Lamaison

[La nouvelle de sa mort] m’a replongée dans plus de 10 années de ma vie... À la suivre dans les petites salles les plus improbables de tout Paris... Car elle ne s’accommodait pas des gens du système français qui ne partageaient pas les mêmes valeurs ni visions de la danse...
Je l’aimais beaucoup, et elle aussi je crois. Ni l’une ni l’autre n’avons jamais été très commodes ni démonstratives. Mais je lui dois mon amour de la danse. C’est énorme.

Anne-Marie Sandrini, ex Inspecteur de la danse des Conservatoires de la Ville de Paris (1998-2008)

Ma rencontre avec Yvonne a été une chance que la vie m’a offerte.
L’extraordinaire richesse de sa carrière ainsi que sa pensée pédagogique m’ont très vite fascinée.
Son élégance, son sourire, son regard qui pouvait passer de la douceur à la plus grande fermeté, son accent si séduisant, sa démarche décidée, sa silhouette de jeune fille, ses boucles blanches faisaient de Yvonne une personnalité hors du commun.
Jai eu souvent l’envie de la serer dans mes bras. Une pudeur, peut être un trop grand respect ont fait que cet élan est resté enfoui au plus profond de moi…
Alors, aujourd’hui chère Yvonne je peux vous dire : Je vous aime.

Stéphanie Corne, Directrice, Académie de danse La Sylvaine, London

Chère Yvonne,

Vous avez été mon professeur quand j’étais étudiante à Paris. Et quel professeur! La danse choisit et vous choisissiez vos élèves aussi ... Chacune d’entre nous devait bien le sentir! L’attention qui ne se détournait pas, Yvonne on savait qu’elle était là. Personnalité hors pair pour nous donner des variations ou enchainements originaux! Personnalité qui allait chercher à nous confronter à dépasser nos limites artistiques, techniques...
Ce que vous m’avez donné je ne l’oublie pas et essaie chaque jour de le transmettre à mes élèves et cela ne peut se résumer.

Soyez en paix Yvonne, c’est plein de danseurs danseuses qui vivent à travers cette transmission...

Merci à vous.

Marie-Josée Redont, Professeur à l’Ecole de l’Opéra de Paris

Lors de notre dernière conversation téléphonique, Yvonne m’a fait deux recommandations primordiales pour le futur que je vais m’efforcer de suivre à la lettre. Je respecterai ses dernières volontés pédagogiques...... Nous perdons une femme d’un grand savoir et d’une énergie hors du commun.

Pier Paolo Gobbo, Ex-Ballet de l’Opéra national de Bordeaux, ex-Maggio musicale fiorentino

Bologna, 3 juillet 2014

Yvonne était quelqu’un de surprenant. A son côté solaire, à son amour fou de la vie, elle alliait le mystère et une certaine inaccessibilité.
En studio, elle se dépassait.
Tout en étant très présente, elle s’effaçait en quelque sorte pour que le sujet reste incontestablement la danse. La musique avait une place primordiale et chaque geste, chaque pas qu’elle proposait revêtait un sens théâtral, même à la barre !
Nous, ses élèves, étions des privilégiés, car elle savait exactement ce qu’elle faisait et où elle voulait nous amener, pour nous aider, nous libérer et nous mettre en valeur. Et elle y parvenait grâce à son regard lucide, sans préjugés ; rien ne l’échappait, mais c’était toujours bienveillant. Nous nous sentions accompagnés. Chaque cours était un voyage : elle fermait ses yeux, écoutait la musique et à travers la danse nous conduisait vers une dimension où le temps était suspendu. Je me souviens de ses longs adages, sur lesquels on passait des heures !
Le cours était si riche, si dansant, poétique, original, amusant et tout simplement juste ! Nous y étions bien et y prenions un plaisir immense.
Lorsque nous travaillions le répertoire ensemble, j’avais le sentiment d’entrer en contact avec quelque chose de plus grand. Sa compréhension des styles était profonde, et elle savait leur rendre toute leur fraîcheur. Chaque pas prenait vie, il fallait le ressentir et se mettre en jeu pour que la danse soit aussi spontanée qu’une improvisation.
Yvonne adorait rire et pimentait nos conversations d’un humour irrésistible ! Et cela jusqu’à la fin de ses jours. C’est à travers cet amour de la vie qu’elle demeurera pour toujours avec nous.
Ma rencontre avec Yvonne a changé le cours de mon existence.


Curriculium Vitae

English

Born in 1928 at Saint-Helier’s Bay, Auckland, New Zealand

Early studies in dance, music and theatre in New Zealand with : Valerie Valeska, Dilyse Askin, Bettina Edwards (a pupil of Margaret Craske’s)

Theatre : Maisie Carte-Lloyd, Helen Griffiths

July 1946: Repertory Ballet Theatre of New Zealand, Auckland - dances excerpts from Ashton’s Façade with Jill Beachen, after Laurel Martyn’s Borovansky version

Yvonne Cartier was awarded the 3rd New Zealand Royal Academy of Dancing Overseas Scholarship for 1946, in March 1947. In February 1948, she reached England on the New Zealand Shipping Co’s Ruahine, to study at the Sadler’s Wells Ballet School (now the RBS)

Ruahine, 1951-1968

Studies in Europe

1948

  • The Sadler’s Wells Ballet School
  • Winifred Edwards (born in 1895, had belonged to Anna Pavlova’s company)
  • Ailne Phillips (1905-1992, a pupil of Lydia Kyasht)
  • Claude Newman
  • Georges Goncharov
  • As a professional dancing in London, she continued to study with : Vera Volkova, Audrey de Vos, Georges Goncharov, Errol Addison (a pupil of Cecchetti)

Career

1949

Soloist with the Saint James Ballet Company, founded by Alan Carter (Arts Council of Great Britain subsidy).

Choreographers : Alan Carter, Angelo Andes, John Cranko, Pauline Grant

1949

Soloist in the revue Sauce Tartare alongside Audrey Hepburn

1950

Soloist, B.B.C. TV Resident Ballet Company, tours

Roles: Swanhilda in Coppelia with Kenneth Russell as Dr. Coppelius, Soirée Musicale d’Anthony Tudor, Tarantella avec David Blair

Touring with the Covent Garden Opera Company

1951

Ballet Festival to save the Kenton Theatre at Henley-on-Thames

This was John Cranko’s first troupe of six young dancers: Kenneth MacMillan, Peter Wright, Sonya Hana (Mrs. Peter Wright), Margaret Scott (later Director of the Australian Ballet School), Vassili Sulich (plus tard directeur/fondateur du Nevada Dance Theatre et Yvonne Cartier

1952

Soloist, Sadler’s Wells Theatre Ballet, danced, inter alia, the following roles:

  • Pineapple Poll (ch. Cranko): Poll and Mrs. Dimple
  • Café des Sports (ch. A. Rodrigues): La Propriétaire
  • Blood Wedding (ch. A. Rodrigues): La Femme and La Servante
  • The Rake’s Progress (ch. Ninette de Valois): The Girl with the Red Stockings, The Ballad, Singer, the Girl with the Corsets
  • Les Sylphides: Prelude

And various soloist roles in Carnaval, Le Lac des Cygnes, Coppelia, The Lady and the Fool etc.

Toured South Africa, Festival of Rhodesia, The Netherlands, Germany, USA, Canada, did television at New York etc.

1955

At Ninette de Valois’ invitation joined the main company, Sadler’s Wells (now Royal) Ballet.
Bone spurs caused her such pain that she resigned in 1957

1957

Leaves the Royal Ballet, as the spurs were at the time inoperable

Mime Studies in France

1957

French Government scholarship to study mime at the School of Jacques Lecoq. Two years of mime study.

1958

Edinburgh International Festival : Ballet mistress for Peggy Van Praagh, who ran the company. It toured Europe: Holland, Belgium, Switzerland, Yugoslavia. The artists were Carla Fracci, Henning Kronstam, Kirsten Simone, Elsa Marianne Von Rosen, Claire Sombert, Max Bozzoni, Milorad Miskovic, Georges Skibine, etc.

1959

BBC TV London for Eurovision,
Carabosse in La Belle au Bois Dormant avec Margot Fonteyn and Michael Somes

FESTIVAL de VENISE: Mime-opera Allez-Hop by Luciano Berio (musique), Italo Calvino (libretto) and Jacques Lecoq (mime)

1961

BBC TV: Hands as a Means of Communication
Rome: The Seven Capital Sins Brecht/Weill.
Compagnie Lecoq with Carla Fracci and Laura Betti (April)

Rome: TV: Etudes aux Allures and Les Trois Soldats.
Produced by Luigi Squarzina. Compagnie Lecoq with Philippe Avron, Claude Evrard and Isaac Alvarez

1962

Return to New Zealand : Conferences and course on mime for the Auckland University Teachers Training College.

Teatro Antico di Siracusa : Classical chorus for Greek theatre: Hécuba and Ione by Euripides, Compagnie Lecoq

London Ballet Club : Demonstration of mime technique with Jacques Lecoq and Pierre Byland

International Mime Festival, Berlin : With the Compagnie Lecoq

1963

ITV, Londres : Passages, Compagnie Lecoq and La Piscine with Pierre Byland, arranged by Lecoq

Joins Marcel Marceau’s troupe : Don Juan, at the Théâtre de la Renaissance

1964

Compagnie Gilles Ségal: Touring France

1965

Théâtre National Populaire: Les Troyennes (translated by J.P. Sartre), Yvonne Cartier, assistant to the director Michel Cacoyannis

She choregraphs dances for Poussière Pourpre by Sean O’Casey, directed by Georges Wilson

Choreographs for Amour pour Amour (Arras: Palais Saint-Vaast, Jeux dramatiques d’Arras, Festival-Concours du Jeune Théâtre (13-06-1965). Director: Armel Marin

1966

Les Troyennes at the Avignon Festival. Yvonne Cartier leads rehearsals in Cacoyannis’ absence

1967

Théâtre National Populaire (TNP) : Assistant to the director Georges Wilson for Grandeur et Décadence de la Ville de Mahagony (Brecht/Weill).

1969

Choreographs the dances for Je ne pense qu’à ça at the Théâtre Gramont – musical satire by Wolinsky and Claude Confortès (October 15th)

1970

Returns to London for Ballet for All (directed by Peter Brinson) at the Royal Ballet Organisation

To mark the centenary of Coppelia, the original version is reconstructed by Paulette Dynalix and Lucien Duthoit of the Paris Opera. Yvonne Cartier dances the role of Frantz en travesti

1978

Choreographs the dances for Pas un navire à l’horizon. Paris, Cour des Miracles (25 septembre). Director: Claude Confortès

1979

Choreographs the dances for C’est l’an 2000, c’est merveilleux! Vénissieux, Théâtre de l’Est Lyonnais. Director: Claude Confortès (23 janvier)

Yvonne also directs Les Hommes j’aime ça. Paris, at the Coupe-chou (17th September).

Teaching

1961

Starts giving lessons in classical dance at the Maison des Jeunes et de la culture at Asnières

1962

Assistant teacher at the l’Ecole de Mime Jacques Lecoq

1965-1976

Teacher of mime and movement at the l’Ecole Charles Dullin

1966

Opens mime and modern dance courses at the Maison des Jeunes et de la culture

1969

Introduces the Royal Academy of Dance’s examination system at the Maison des Jeunes et de la culture at Asnières

1970

Puts an end to her stage career to devote herself entirely to teaching and choreography
Teaches at Paris Centre

1982-1986

Guest teacher, England, Spain, Canada and New Zealand

1984

Teaches at the Conservatoire Marius Petipa, Paris and the Conservatoires de la Ville de Paris. Her pupils Muriel Valtat and Bétina Marcolin are awarded the RAD’s Solo Seal Award on the same day; the jury is chaired by Margot Fonteyn.

1986

Head of the Dance Department, Saskatchewan School of Performing Arts, Canada. Yvonne Cartier teaches and advises Tonia Stefiuk-Olson, later a soloist with Salt Lake City Ballet (Utah)

1987

International course at Wellington, New Zealand. Guest teacher, New Zealand School of Dance

1987-1991

Teaches for the Conservatoires de la Ville de Paris in the 9th, 13th and 17th arrondissements and at the Conservatoire Marius Petipa

1992

Bétina Marcolin is appointed soloist of the Royal Swedish Ballet

1993

Muriel Valtat is appointed at the Royal Ballet, Covent Garden

1995

Is appointed Life Member of the Royal Academy of Dance for her pioneering work to introduce the system into France

2007

Joins the Société Auguste Vestris (non-profit, public interest Society - Association 1901 reconnue d’intérêt général) as a member of its Scientific Committee

2009-2013

Leads rehearsals for the Nuits Blanches de Saint-Petersbourg, the Nuits Blanches du Risorgimento and the Grandes Leçons of the Société Auguste Vestris at the Centre de danse du Marais. Teaches students from French vocational schools extracts from the Conservatoire by August Bournonville prior to the arrival in France of the Royal Theatre’s Flemming Ryberg.

2011

June : Gives a Master Class for the Conservatoire du 19ème arrondissement of Paris

November : Le Style – terrain de jeu de l’imaginaire. With Ethéry Pagava (who taught the section on Liubov Egorova), gives a Grande Leçon for the Société Auguste Vestris and the Centre de danse du Marais : students of the Conservatoire national supérieur de musique et de danse de Paris dance the Grand adage by Tamar Karsavina.

2007-2013

Gives Class of Perfection lessons to Pier-Paolo Gobbo (ex-Ballet de l’Opéra de Bordeaux and Maggio Musicale Fiorentino), Emma Brest (Cannes Jeune Ballet), Chikako Nishikawa of the Inoue Ballet Foundation, and students of Marie-Josée Redont of the Paris Opera School.

Teaches in Bétina Marcolin’s studio at Stockholm, at Lucca and Viareggio at the invitation of Giulia Meniccuci, at Poissy at the invitation of Cécile Daeniker of Danse en Ile de France, at Bologna at the invitation of Pier-Paolo Gobbo and at Ravenna in Mariarosa Bruna’s Scuola di danza Città di Ravenna

Publications

Ballet for Beginners by Felicity Andreae Gray. Phoenix House Limited, London 1952. Model for photographs.

Mime in Ballet by Beryl Morina. Yvonne Cartier is advisor, Muriel Valtat is the Model for the photographs. Woodstock Winchester Press, Winchester, 2000. ISBN: 9780953935802

On Technique. Yvonne Cartier is amongst the 18 teachers interviewed by Dean Speer. University Press of Florida, 2010. ISBN 13: 978-0-8130-3438-6

Dancing with Delight - Footprints of the Past: Dance and Dancers in Early Twentieth Century Auckland by Cherie Devliotis. Polygraphia, Limited, West Harbour, New Zealand, 2005. ISBN 10: 1877332259

French

Née en 1928 à Saint-Helier’s Bay, Auckland, Nouvelle Zélande

Premières études de danse, musique et théâtre en Nouvelle-Zélande auprès de Valerie Valeska, Dilyse Askin, Bettina Edwards

Théâtre : Maisie Carte-Lloyd, Helen Griffiths

July 1946: Repertory Ballet Theatre of New Zealand, Auckland - danse dans des extraits de Façade de from Ashton, avec Jill Beachen, d’après la version de Laurel Martyn pour le Borovansky Ballet

Suite à un concours national, en mars 1947 Yvonne Cartier gagne la New Zealand Royal Academy of Dancing Overseas Scholarship pour 1946. Elle arrive en Angleterre en février 1948 sur le navire Ruahine du New Zealand Shipping Co. et poursuit ses études au Sadler’s Wells Ballet School (aujourd’hui Ecole du Ballet Royal)

Ruahine, 1951-1968

Etudes en Europe

1948

  • The Sadler’s Wells Ballet School
  • Winifred Edwards (née en 1895, membre de la troupe d’Anna Pavlova)
  • Ailne Phillips (1905-1992, élève de Lydia Kyasht)
  • Claude Newman
  • Georges Goncharov
  • Devenue professionnelle à Londres, étudie auprès de Vera Volkova, Audrey de Vos, Georges Goncharov, Errol Addison (élève de Cecchetti)

Vie professionnelle

1949

Soliste au Saint James Ballet Company, troupe fondée par Alan Carter et subventionnée par le Arts Council of Great Britain.

Chorégraphes : Alan Carter, Angelo Andes, John Cranko, Pauline Grant

1949

Soliste dans la revue Sauce Tartare aux côtés d’Audrey Hepburn

1950

Soliste, BBC. TV Resident Ballet Company, tournée avec cette troupe

Rôles tenus : Swanhilda dans Coppelia avec Kenneth Russell, Soirée Musicale d’Anthony Tudor, Tarantella avec David Blair

Tournée avec Covent Garden Opera Company

1951

Festival de Ballet au Kenton Theatre à Henley-on-Thames. C’était la première troupe formée par John Cranko, groupe de six jeunes danseurs : Kenneth MacMillan (plus tard principal chorégraphe du Royal Ballet, Londres), Peter Wright (plus tard Directeur du Royal Ballet à Sadler’s Wells et de Birmingham Royal Ballet), Sonya Hana (Mme Peter Wright), Margaret Scott (plus tard Directrice de l’Ecole Nationale du Ballet d’Australie), Vassili Sulich (plus tard directeur/fondateur du Nevada Dance Theatre, et Yvonne Cartier

1952

Soliste, Sadler’s Wells Theatre Ballet. (A cette époque la troupe n’avait que des jeunes danseurs entre 16 et 25 ans et le chorégraphe principal était John Cranko)

Danse les rôles suivants :

  • Pineapple Poll (ch. Cranko) : Poll et Mrs. Dimple
  • Café des Sports (ch. A. Rodrigues) : La Propriétaire
  • Blood Wedding (ch. A. Rodrigues) : La Femme et La Servante
  • The Rake’s Progress (ch. Ninette de Valois) : The Girl with the Red Stockings, The Ballad Singer, the Girl with the Corsets
  • Les Sylphides : le Prélude

Et divers rôles de soliste dans Carnaval, Le Lac des Cygnes, Coppelia, The Lady and the Fool etc.

Tournées en Afrique du Sud, Festival de Rhodésie, Pays-Bas, Allemagne, Etats Unis d’Amérique, Canada, Télévision à New York etc.

1955

A l’invitation de Ninette de Valois, rejoint la troupe principale, Sadler’s Wells Ballet, renommée The Royal Ballet en 1956. Des éperons osseux l’empêchent cependant de danser au niveau de ses propres exigences.

1957

Quitte le Royal Ballet, la blessure à la cheville étant inopérable à l’époque

Etudes de mime en France

1957

Bourse du Gouvernement français pour étudier le mime à l’Ecole de Jacques Lecoq. Deux ans d’étude de mime

1958

Edinburgh International Festival : Assistante de Peggy Van Praagh, directrice de la Compagnie

Tournée en Europe : Hollande, Belgique, Suisse, Yugoslavie. Avec les artistes Carla Fracci, Henning Kronstam, Kirsten Simone, Elsa Marianne Von Rosen, Claire Sombert, Max Bozzoni, Milorad Miskovic, Georges Skibine, etc.

1959

BBC TV Londres pour Eurovision : Carabosse dans La Belle au Bois Dormant avec Margot Fonteyn et Michael Somes

FESTIVAL de VENISE : Opéra-mime Allez-Hop de Luciano Berio (musique), Italo Calvino (livret) et Jacques Lecoq (mime)

1961

BBC TV : Hands as a Means of Communication. Demonstration du rôle des mains dans la pantomime des ballets

Rome : Les Sept péchés capitaux Brecht/Weill. Compagnie Lecoq avec Carla Fracci et Laura Betti (avril)

Rome : TV : Etudes aux Allures et Les Trois Soldats. Producteur : Luigi Squarzina. Compagnie Lecoq avec Philippe Avron, Claude Evrard et Isaac Alvarez

1962

Retour en Nouvelle-Zelande : conférences et stage sur le mime pour le Teachers Training College de l’Université d’Auckland. Pédagogie pour les enfants.

Teatro Antico di Siracusa : chœur classique pour le théâtre grec : Hécuba et Ione d’Euripide, Compagnie Lecoq

Ballet Club de Londres : démonstration de technique de mime avec Jacques Lecoq et Pierre Byland

International Mime Festival de Berlin : avec la Compagnie Lecoq

1963

ITV (télévision), Londres : Passages, Compagnie Lecoq et La Piscine avec Pierre Byland, arrange par Lecoq

Rejoint le Compagnie Marcel Marceau : Don Juan, au Théâtre de la Renaissance

1964

Compagnie Gilles Ségal : Tournée en France

1965

Théâtre National Populaire : Les Troyennes (Trad. J.P. Sartre). Yvonne Cartier est l’assistante de Michel Cacoyannis

Elle crée des danses pour Poussière Pourpre de Sean O’Casey, mise en scène par Georges Wilson

Chorégraphe pour le spectacle : Amour pour Amour (Arras : Palais Saint-Vaast aux Jeux dramatiques d’Arras, Festival-Concours du Jeune Théâtre (13-06-1965). Metteur en scène : Armel Marin

1966

Reprise des Troyennes au Festival d’Avignon. Yvonne Cartier dirige les répétitions en l’absence de Cacoyannis

1967

Théâtre National Populaire (TNP) : assistante de Georges Wilson pour Grandeur et Décadence de la Ville de Mahagony (Brecht/Weill).

1969

Chorégraphe pour Je ne pense qu’à ça au Théâtre Gramont - satire musicale par Wolinsky et Claude Confortès (15 octobre)

1970

Retour à Londres pour Ballet for All (dir. Peter Brinson) du Royal Ballet Organisation

C’est le centenaire de Coppelia. Reconstruction de la version originale par Paulette Dynalix et Lucien Duthoit de l’Opéra de Paris ; Yvonne Cartier y danse le rôle de Frantz en travesti

1978

Chorégraphe pour Pas un navire à l’horizon. Paris à la Cour des Miracles (25 septembre). Metteur en scène : Claude Confortès

1979

Chorégraphe pour C’est l’an 2000, c’est merveilleux!, Vénissieux, Théâtre de l’Est Lyonnais. Metteur en scène : Claude Confortès (23 janvier)

Yvonne est également metteur en scène du spectacle Les Hommes j’aime ça. Paris, au Coupe-chou (17 septembre).

Enseignement

1961

Ouvre un cours de danse classique à la Maison des Jeunes et de la culture à Asnières

1962

Assistante à l’Ecole de Mime de Jacques Lecoq

1965-1976

Professeur de mime et mouvement à l’Ecole Charles Dullin

1966

Ouvre un cours de mime à la Maison des Jeunes et de la culture et de danse moderne

1969

Introduit en France les examens de la Royal Academy of Dance à la MJC Asnières

1970

Quitte la scène pour se consacrer à l’enseignement et à la chorégraphie
Enseigne à Paris Centre

1982-1986

Enseigne en Angleterre, en Espagne, au Canada et en Nouvelle-Zélande comme professeur invité

1984

Professeur au Conservatoire Marius Petipa, Paris et Conservatoires de la Ville de Paris
Ses élèves Muriel Valtat et Bétina Marcolin obtiennent le même jour et la même année le Solo Seal Award de la Royal Academy of Dance devant un jury que préside Margot Fonteyn.

1986

Directeur du Département de danse. Saskatchewan School of Performing Arts, Canada
Yvonne Cartier conseille Tonia Stefiuk-Olson, qui deviendra soliste de Ballet West (Utah)

1987

Stage International à Wellington, Nouvelle-Zélande. Professeur invité, New Zealand School of Dance

1987-1991

Professeur des Conservatoires de la Ville de Paris dans les 9e, 13e et 17e arr. et au Conservatoire Marius Petipa

1992

Bétina Marcolin est nommé soliste du Ballet de l’Opéra royal de Stockholm

1993

Muriel Valtat devient First Soloist du Royal Ballet

1995

Est nommée Membre à vie du Royal Academy of Dance pour son travail d’introduction du système en France

2007

Rejoint la Société Auguste Vestris (Association 1901 reconnue d’intérêt général) dès sa formation, comme membre du Conseil Scientifique

2009-2013

Comme répétiteur, participe aux Nuits Blanches de Saint-Petersbourg, aux Nuits Blanches du Risorgimento, aux Grandes Leçons de la Société Auguste Vestris au Centre de danse du Marais comme répétiteur. Instruit notamment les extraits du Conservatoire d’August Bournonville pour préparer l’arrivée en France de Flemming Ryberg du Théâtre Royal.

2011

Juin : Master Class au Conservatoire du 19ème arrondissement de Paris

Novembre : Le Style – terrain de jeu de l’imaginaire. Grande Leçon de la Société Auguste Vestris en collaboration avec le Centre de danse du Marais. Etude du grand adage de Tamar Karsavina avec des élèves du CNSMDP. Soirée donnée en collaboration avec Ethéry Pagava.

2007-2013

Donne des cours de perfectionnement à Pier-Paolo Gobbo (ex Ballet de l’Opéra de Bordeaux et Maggio Musicale Fiorentino), à Emma Brest (Cannes Jeune Ballet), à Chikako Nishikawa de l’Inoue Ballet Foundation, à plusieurs élèves de Marie-Josée Redont de l’Opéra national de Paris.

Enseigne à Stockholm au studio de Bétina Marcolin, à Lucques et Viareggio à l’invitation de Giulia Meniccuci, à Poissy à l’invitation de Cécile Daeniker de Danse en Ile de France, à Bologna à l’invitation de Pier-Paolo Gobbo et à Ravenne dans la Scuola di danza Città di Ravenna de Mariarosa Bruna...

Publications

Ballet for Beginners par Felicity Andreae Gray. Phoenix House Limited, London 1952. Modèle des illustrations photographiques.

Mime in Ballet par Beryl Morina. Yvonne Cartier est conseiller, Muriel Valtat le modèle des illustrations photographiques. Woodstock Winchester Press, Winchester, 2000. ISBN: 9780953935802

On Technique. Yvonne Cartier est l’un des 18 professeurs interviewés dans ce recueil d’entretiens par Dean Speer. University Press of Florida, 2010. ISBN 13: 978-0-8130-3438-6 

Dancing with Delight - Footprints of the Past: Dance and Dancers in Early Twentieth Century Auckland par Cherie Devliotis, Edité par Polygraphia, Limited, West Harbour, New Zealand, 2005. ISBN 10: 1877332259